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Jan 3, 2013 4:00pm PST
there for reasons related to civil rights and seniority went into the republican party. and race began to fall away as the organizing principle in life. so the parties became more ideological separate from one another. democrats agreeing with democrats, republicans agreeing with republicans. as that happened, they began to act as units. we don't have a political system set up very well for parties to act as units. the founders didn't want there to be parties at all. they were very against factions even though they went on to create a number of them. the 112th was a culmination of a lot of trends we've been seeing over the last 40 or 50 years. and the composition of the congress in which you had a republican speaker from the republican minority in the house. you had a very slim democratic majority in the senate that was subject to the filibuster and a democratic president the republicans were trying to defeat was a perfect cocktail for this paralysis and polarization but i'm not optimistic about the 113th because even if they do try to do things through regular order, these same underlying dynamics
Jan 7, 2013 12:00pm EST
group of prisoners in new york, persons incarcerated through civil commitment without a right to a hearing beforehand or to a lawyer or right to confront accusers? and with rules of evidence suspended? this and no right to a lawyer afterward, after the person's rights are compromised and their credibility especially? is anyone looking into the constitutional violations? >> yes. the american -- the aclu has actually been very active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several terms ago, actually, issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights of those in civil commitments and really rooked at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation, but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so that's -- it's kind of an ongoing project, and it exists a lot in a host of different contexts. i don'ti don't know if you're tg about a specific context, but for sex offenses, people committed for mental, because of mental illnesses and there are a range of i
Jan 9, 2013 8:00pm EST
that complies with civil rights, but, of course, has an overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out proand con from law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado about implications and whether moving towards legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i worked my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i mean i heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. well, one thing we have to do now is have a standard that protect people who visit our state and drive on the roads so people know that that's -- there is going to be a safe system for them, and we're not sure yet how to do that. our legislature has that as job one now in the new session that starts this week in colorado, and your point of vu, your input would be valuable in our state. >> against legalization in colorado; is that right? >> i was opposed to it. i also publicly predicted it would not pass. my credibility is nil. [laughter] >> i have to say i support this, and i predicted it to pass. [laughter] i think, you k
Jan 4, 2013 2:00pm EST
like civil rights movement or getting the right to vote for women in this country, and sometimes it has to come from top-down change. when that top-down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. buy and large they are not perceived to be efficiently enforced, so that the exploiter doesn't have to adapt too much or just enough evade identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. as a more particular way of asking that question, i'd like to hear you say what your study of the shrimp supply chain suggests about appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it might not make more sense to draw a line between slavery and ot
Jan 7, 2013 7:00am EST
more fire men and civil workers down here. he needs to go and go fast. host: maxine offering her political opinion. guest: first and foremost, you are right, ohio eliminated its estate tax. it used to have an exemption of only about $385,000, one of the lowest in the country's estate death taxes. but ohio is one state that is repealing its estate tax. here in our neck of the wisdom of virginia no longer has an estate tax, while the district of columbia and maryland do. as a result, people are moving from d.c. and maryland, crossing the potomac river and taking up residence in virginia in anticipation of the death and estate tax. as far as income tax in ohio, you have township taxes in addition to the state income taxes. there is a very interesting wrinkle or sometimes it is better to file separate then -- separate than file joint returns. host: "the new york times" has a piece that talks about the high earners, but it says the legislation approved by both houses of congress would increase taxes on people with incomes that are not quite as high as well, because the bill includes l
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5